Guitars Dave Grohl Plays

Guitars Dave Grohl Plays

Guitars Dave Grohl Plays

If you’re looking for a guitar reminiscent of the sounds of Dave Grohl, you’ve come to the right place. For the ultimate Foo Fighters experience, check out the guitars Dave Grohl plays. From the Martin D-28 to the Gibson Explorer, Grohl knows how to get the most out of his instrument. Read on to learn more. This guitar is sure to become one of your favorites.

Trini Lopez ES-335

The Gibson Trini Lopez ES-335 Ebony 2015 is a fine example of the semi-hollow guitar. This limited-edition model is made of ebony wood and retails for $3,299 plus shipping. While the ES-335 is one of the more affordable models in the Trini Lopez line, it is also highly sought after. It is known for its treble and bass tones and has been the guitar of choice for countless professional guitarists.

The Trini Lopez ES-335 Standard is a semi-hollow-body guitar with a maple center block and a diamond-shaped hole. Its aged cherry nitro finish and non-reverse Firebird headstock are reminiscent of Gibson guitars from the 1960s. If you’re looking for a guitar with a vintage look and feel, the ES-335 Deluxe is a great option.

A classic semi-hollow guitar with classic looks, the Trini Lopez ES-335 features the timeless style of the original. Diamond f-holes and a six-a-side Firebird headstock help distinguish this instrument from the rest. The guitar also features full Gibson craftsmanship, an authentic Sixties Cherry finish, and a ’57 Classic humbucker.’ Having such an iconic instrument in your collection is a great way to show off your musical style!

Gibson produced the Trini Lopez ES-335 Standard in limited quantities. It is reminiscent of the Gibson ES-335TD. The ES-335 is also available with six-a-side headstocks, similar to Gibson’s Firebirds. The guitars feature Kluson Six-on-a-Strap tuners. The Trini Lopez ES-335 has a gold finish and comes with a Gibson certificate of authenticity.

Martin D-28

You may have seen Dave Grohl’s Martin D-28 on his acclaimed album Skin and Bones. This acoustic guitar is renowned for its fine-tuned craftsmanship and rich tonal qualities. It is only natural that the guitarist would choose only the best guitars to play live. And we’re not wrong. Grohl certainly does. Check out the video below to see Grohl playing his Martin D-28 on Kilborn.

Besides playing with Queens of the Stone Age, Dave Grohl is also an accomplished solo artist. In addition to writing many Foo Fighters classics, he’s been a member of several groups, including Nirvana and Scream. After the disbandment of Nirvana, Dave Grohl decided to make a demo tape. He played all the guitar parts except for one.

Until 2007, this guitar was Dave Grohl’s main choice for live performances. Eventually, he decided to customize the instrument to look like a Matchbox car. Unfortunately, the result was a skeleton of a guitar. It is believed that Grohl still has the guitar lying around somewhere. It is unknown when he last played it live, but it’s safe to say that it’s probably somewhere in his home.

As an aside, the guitar Grohl plays in the video for “The Pretender” was a black Firebird with a white pickguard. Other Firebird models were similar, although this one is considered to be his most famous. However, the black Firebird is not Grohl’s primary choice. He uses other guitars in his videos, including a white Gibson J-100 and a Martin D-28.

Les Paul Standard

Many rock musicians play Gibson guitars, but few can match the sound of a Les Paul. Famous guitar players include Bono and Brian Setzer. Grohl has been compared to both. In this article, we will take a look at both types of guitars and determine which one is right for you. Hopefully, you will find the perfect fit for your playing style. But before we get into that, let’s look at the history of Les Paul.

The Les Paul was the first guitar ever made by Gibson and is the most popular model. This guitar is made of lightweight and durable materials, making it ideal for live performances. The guitar was inspired by the Les Paul standard model, and the original was made in 1926. In addition to the Les Paul, Dave Grohl owns several Martin guitars, including the famous “D-28.”

The guitar has a nut width of 1-11/16 inches, a stop tailpiece, and an ABR-1 bridge. The body, trim, and back are made of laminated maple. Grohl uses a Voodoo Lab Pedal Power 2 Plus FX Power Supply. In addition to the Les Paul Standard guitar, Grohl uses an Electro-Harmonix Deluxe Memory Man Delay Pedal. It has a modulation setting, allowing the guitarist to adjust the tone of the guitar-based on his desired sound.

Another Gibson guitar that Dave Grohl owns is a custom-built DG-335. The musician teamed up with Gibson, a struggling company, to create a guitar that would honor the famous racecar driver Dale Earnhardt. The model has a diamond f-hole and firebird headstock, similar to the one that Trini Lopez played. It is also semi-hollow, which minimizes feedback and contributes to the Foo Fighters sound.

Gibson Explorer

If you’re a fan of Dave Grohl playing guitar, then you’ve probably seen videos of him on stage playing the Gibson Explorer. Grohl first picked up a guitar like this for his first solo album, the self-titled debut, back in 1981. It had a built-in amplifier, and he was immediately hooked. He even had a Gibson Explorer in his home and used it to record demos. The guitar’s unique design made it a hit for the band and helped to establish its reputation.

Grohl rarely plays anything other than a Gibson Explorer. Although his first guitar was an Epiphone, he later switched to Gibson for the rest of his career. He rarely uses his Les Paul. His favorite models are the Gibson Explorer and ES-335. Other notable models include the Hagstrom, a model that was first produced in the 1990s. This guitar is still being produced today as it was in 2011.

While the guitars he plays for Foo Fighters are often iconic, they’re also extremely valuable to the band. Dave Grohl has had several of these throughout his career, including a custom-built DG-335 model that was modeled after the Trini Lopez Signature. It features diamond f-holes, a firebird headstock, and split diamond inlays. Gibson’s DG-335 guitars were originally available in Pelham Blue, Ebony, and Metallic Gold, and Dave Grohl is now even bringing a metallic gold model to the table.

The Explorer guitar is also used by the Edge, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Def Leppard, Scorpions, and Brendon Small. Dave Grohl has used several amps with Foo Fighters over the years, including the Vox AC30 combo amp and Friedman BE amp head. In the studio, he uses a bespoke stack amplification set-up, a pedalboard with five core effects pedals, and a VOX AC30.

Vox AC-30

If you like to listen to hard rock, you may want to check out Dave Grohl’s guitar rig. Among the Foo Fighters’ guitar rig, the AC30 is one of the most iconic. The AC30 became the most popular amplifier used by Dave Grohl on his solo albums, but it is not just any amp. It fits into Grohl’s philosophy of playing good distortion without using effects pedals, and his AC30 is a great choice.

Another great choice for a clean acoustic guitar is the Vox AC30. This reverb-based head offers a sonic signature that is unmatched by other amps. During the Nevermind era, Cobain’s rig was very minimal, with only a guitar and pedals. Jack White, who is part of the alt-rock duo The White Stripes, prefers a different acoustic guitar.

Throughout his career, Grohl has used many guitars, but one that stands out is the Gibson ES-355. Its full-body sound is one of the band’s trademark sounds. The AC-30 also has a classic look that he favors. As a result, it may be easier to identify Grohl’s signature tone. If you’re wondering what the difference is between this guitar and a standard electric guitar, read on!

The AC-30 is a guitar that has been used by rockers for 45 years. It was originally hand-wired and built during the Dallas Arbiter period. The first AC-30 was bought by Alan Williams, lead singer of the Rubettes, in 1968. Dave Grohl is just one of many legendary rockers to use an AC-30. Its serial numbering conventions are often unpredictable, and early models can be difficult to distinguish from later versions.